Japan for coffee addicts

When it comes to finding a decent cup of coffee in Japan, as the saying goes, there’s some good news and some bad news.

The good is you can get amazing coffee big cities, like Tokyo and Kyoto.

The bad – you will usually have to wait til at least 10 am (often midday or even later) for your first hit.

For the caffeine-sensitive coffee lovers like me, that second revelation posed a bit of a challenge during my recent trip to Japan. I’m more a savour-a-strong-espresso before breakfast kind of gal, rather than drink it all day and keep it coming!

Like coffee, breakfast is a late affair. Beyond the 24 hour diners (where you order and pay for your meal at a vending machine before being seated), or rice balls from convenience stores –  finding that first meal of the day can be challenge for travellers.

I didn’t risk the beverages in either of those early morning options, nor the machines that vend a can of hot or cold coffee. Though did resort to using some supermarket bought pour over ground coffee bags a couple of times.

But there were some standout coffee shops, though they had little or no breakfast options.

 

Tokyo

Frankie is right at home in hipster Shimokitazawa. I spied it on the first night and thought it had a very familiar look. Straight out of Melbourne like the owner, this café not only makes exceptional coffee but also an assortment of Australian cakes and slices to go with your flat white. Coffee is Allpress (and they also sell Aeropress’s if you want a lightweight travelling companion).

Opens most days at 10 am (just look for the queue of Australasians waiting to get in). Check the website, as their hours have recently changed.

400Yen for your long black or flat white.

155-0031 Setagaya-ku, Tokyo Kitazawa 2-chome, 12-15

http://www.frankie.jp

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Shimokitazawa is a great suburb for coffee lovers, at least for the ones who don’t need a hit early in the day. All theseplaces looked amazing, just maddening closed when I needed a hit. If staying in this neighbourhood again, I’d pick up an Aeropress from Frankie and stock up on freshly ground beans around the corner at Maldive

 

Sarutahiko in Ebisu is unique in its offerings. This tiny café has great music, outstanding coffee and a (single) breakfast option. But add free Wi-Fi (another rarity in this technologically advanced country) and wait for it – 7.30 am opening (weekdays, 10 am weekends) and its worth booking your next Airbnb in this area.

 

240 yen for excellent house brew (hot or cold), 450 for most other coffees.

Great news: They’ve rolled out more locations across Tokyo.

Tip: The granola breakfast set with their signature drip/cold brew coffee is a great way to start the day. (They’ll let you sub hot chocolate is coffee isn’t your thing).

 

Kyoto

100% Arabica has “good coffee” written all over it and it didn’t disappoint. This light and airy coffee haven with the ubiquitous blonde wood fit out off the main drag in the historic Higashiyama area, was a mere two blocks away from where I stayed. Best of all they open at 8am. The perfect time for a caffeine hit. Though not so good for my tea-drinking companion as this place serves coffee and nothing else.

The Tokyo-born owner loves the stuff so much that he bought a coffee plantation in Hawaii. 100% Arabica has three locations in Kyoto, and a handful more sprinkled around the world.

87 Hoshinochō, Higashiyama-ku, Kyōto-shi, Kyōto-fu 605-0853

http://www.arabica.coffee/#cafe-kyoto

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Sentido: Another gift from the caffeine god, was stumbling upon this small cafe. Not only does it open at a reasonable hour but, unlike 100% Arabica, they have a small breakfast menu (and serve other beverages). From memory there were only a couple of options, toasted banana bread with the world’s tiniest but well formed cube of butter, or a small bowl of cereal with fruit and yoghurt.

The espresso was perfect and the toasted banana bread made a nice snack to go with it (thank goodness for the rice balls!)

While searching Sentido’s address I came across a blog post that mentioned the owner learned to make coffee while living in Melbourne. No wonder it was so good!

1F Nippo Karasuma Bldg, 445 Sasaya-cho, Kyoto, Japan, 604-8187

Open: 7:30am – 7:00pm Monday – Friday, 8:00am – 7:00pm Saturday (closed Sunday)

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A note of Japanese addresses: the non-consecutive street numbers can be very confusing, that’s because they’re numbered in the order they’re built. A “pocket Wi-Fi” (a phone sized mobile modem) and Google maps, will save you hours of confusion when hunting for your first fix of the day.

 

Does this post look familiar? It was first published in my anonymous foodblog. If you recognise it, say hello.

Six of the best: Chiang Mai

Snuggled within the ancient walls of the old city, it’s hard to believe that Chiang Mai is the second largest metropolis in Thailand. In the far north of the country, near Laos and Myanmar borders, Chiang Mai is a cool oasis in summer but even in the humid, rainy season offers a relaxing holiday destination.

Beyond the elephant camps, Hill Tribe villages and docile tigers, you can spend a month in this city without getting bored. Here are six of my best Chiang Mai experiences.

1. Noodles: There’s so much more to this food group than Pad Thai. You’ll find the regional specialty Khao Soi (curry noodles) on the menu from breakfast through to dinner. I’m of fan of ‘big noodles’ of wide, luscious rice noodles ‘massaged’ with soy and other sauces, served with stir fried tofu and vegetables.

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2. Markets: Chiang Mai’s markets are legendary. From the local produce markets that pop up everywhere to the massive Warorot markets, locals and tourists alike love them. Without a doubt, the sprawling Sunday Walking Market on Ratchadamnon Road is the best – great food, interesting wares and lots of happy Thai people enjoying their weekend ritual.

3. Wander through the back sois (lanes). Off the major streets lie dozens of meandering laneways. Observe local life and stop for a drink or meal at one of the many unnassuming cafes (like Natures Way and Peppermint café, open all day with free wife, fresh food and friendly service).

4. Hire a driver. We were driven in a spotless modern taxi for the day for a mere 1500 baht (~ Au$50, shared between three). If you want to do something other than Hill Tribes, elephants, rafting or zip lining – do your own research first and make a wish list. Our driver was a little resistant to our plans at first (so remember to negotiate itinerary as well as price before sealing the deal) but we managed to get him off the track for a swim in a waterfall and lunch at a health spa out of the city.

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5. Follow the monks. Take an early morning walk to watch the sunrise glint off the wats, monks walking the streets to collect offerings or to just sit in the grounds of a temple and listen to the chanting. My favourite pre-breakfast walks includes the river, being the only farang at the San Pakoy market and catching the sunrise at Wat Chedi Luang.

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6. Relax. As a massage slut from way back, I was in my element sampling the full spectrum from foot massages at the walking markets, to cheapies and luxurious spas.

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Coffee – an espresso to rival any in Melbourne.

Massage – go for broke and book a package, you won’t regret it.

Map/tips – you’ll never get bored with a Nancy Chandler map (but remember to check the website for updates)

Vegan/vegetarian visiting Chiang Mai – read my top tips.

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The Highline: the happiest mile in NYC

The number one recommendation from almost everyone I know who’d visited New York in the last couple of years was a unanimous, “walk the High Line”.

 

The most loved mile of NYC, has only been open for four years. It didn’t take much for me to join the legion of fans. The High Line had me at my first glance in Gansevoort Street.

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It’s hard to explain what makes a chunk of elevated rail line exciting. It’s a park, art gallery, café and general hangout. What’s more there are extraordinary views of the Hudson River, iconic architecture and one of the most dynamic city skylines in the world.

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I managed to walk five lengths of the High Line while in NYC and caught its many moods including a sunny Sunday stroll, midweek dash uptown and a perfect summer’s evening. Each time the park was populated by locals, visitors, date night couples, singles escaping their pokey rooms grabbing a bench and watching videos on their phone (and free wife). There were families, tourists and downtown diehards who rarely roam more than 10 blocks from home.

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What I loved the most: wild flowers, Chelsea Thicket, blossoms scenting the night, art everywhere and even the furniture. But equally it was what neighboured the park: glimpsing lives lived cheek and jowl, night clubs, restaurants, homes, graffiti, street scenes, the Empire State building but most of all the modern architecture. The curves of HL23, the Standard Hotel straddling the path like an open book and Frank Geary’s IAC (especially for the golden hour at night when it’s see through) are the new landmarks in the city.

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Every visit deepened my enjoyment of the High Line but our last one topped the lot. It was a stunning, June night, sated on great food and a proseco or two at a neighbourhood bar (West Village bless your organic cotton socks – restaurants and bars to die for AND an apartment a mere two blocks from the High Line!). Up the Ganesvoort stairs, even Hoboken and Queens looked magical across the Hudson, dressed in glittering lights. The warm air was perfumed by flowers in full bloom, music pulsed from exclusive penthouse clubs and the pop up eateries buzzed. I swear every single person was grinning ear to ear, with the full on sensory emersion.

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The High Line is barely more than a mile but it has to be the happiest mile in the city. It certainly gladdened my heart. Sure it doesn’t have the achingly wide spaces of Central Park but I’d take the grit of downtown over the exclusivity of Fifth Avenue any day.

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Brooklyn food and fleas

Not the jumping, biting kind.

Just across the bridge from Manhattan, Brooklyn has some of the best vintage and food markets in the state.

First stop, the Saturday flea at Fort Greene.

Some vegan ‘noodles’ as a palate cleanser.

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Followed by mahi-mahi tacos, that green apple salsa was a revelation.

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And everyone should have a rhubarb and Thai basil soda, at least once in their life (twice even better!)

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Then we hopped the subway to Wiilliamsburg, to catch Smorgasburg before it closed.

A market snuggled next to the Williamsburg bridge with million dollar views.

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For an ice cream.

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Mr Berrington could fool an omni – blackberry/chocolate a stellar combo on a hot day.

Don’t forget to check out the undercover weekend market on 7th Street on your way back to the subway. Full of new and used clothes and art, plus the cutest little toilet totem in town.

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